US Wellness News Alert

Summer Sunsets & Steak Sales 




 
July 28, 2013
Monticello, Missouri
  

Dear John,    

  June Cattle
We've had great weather here in Northeast Missouri this week.  We were finally blessed with rain earlier in the week, which has rejuvenated our pastures and also brought us slightly cooler temperatures.  

We are excited to introduce two new products this week!  We now have a Bone-In French Ribeye, often referred to as a Cowboy Ribeye, in stock.  These steaks average 16-20 ounces each and are packed with flavor.   We also have Beef Tripe Pieces in stock, averaging 1.5 lbs each.  This hard-to-find cut is sourced from our 100% grass-fed and grass-finished cattle.   The new Honeycomb Tripe is also selling well, if you aren't sure how to prepare tripe, our friend Russ at The Domestic Man just posted a delicious Mexican Tripe Soup recipe that we highly recommend!  Check it out in our recipe section below. 

Can eating more help you lose weight?  Depends on what you are eating.  There are certain foods that can help your weight loss efforts, and we ran across this interesting list this week.  We were happy to see some of our favorites on the list, such as olive oil, eggs, cinnamon, lean beef and nuts.  Grass-fed beef is an excellent source of CLA (conjugated linoleic acid), which has been shown to boost lean muscle mass and promote weight loss. 

Some of our favorite summer steaks are on sale this week - the 6 oz Top Butt Sirloin is a quick fix and makes a great salad steak or lunch steak.  The Flat Irons are a very tender cut and one of the most cost effective ways to purchase grass-fed steaks!

We apologize for the extended inventory shortage in the chicken department this month.  Very dry conditions in the Midwest have affected growth rates for our birds and we have had to delay the last couple scheduled harvests.  We did harvest more birds this week and expect chicken to restock next week.  The website will be updated just as soon as we have more inventory available. 

Mark your calendar to spend September 7th & 8th at Joel Salatin's Polyface Farm in Swope, VA raising money for the Farm to Consumer Legal Defense Fund. Free tickets and lodging for two 'Save Your Bacon' giveaway ends August 29th at midnight EST. Discounted room rates expire on August 5th. Event details here.


If you are using Gmail email, you may already be aware of recent updates that sort your emails differently.  If your email account has been updated, you may need to check the "promotions" tab to find our mailings.  If they are landing there, you can move them over to the "primary" email folder.  If you have any questions or are having trouble accessing our newsletters please email us.

Stay current with all of our sales, specials and giveaways by following us on Facebook or Twitter.  We're always posting new recipes and cooking tips along with our favorite new cookbooks on Pinterest!

Summer Regards,

 

John, Lee Ann, Tressa, Jennifer, Amanda and Laura on behalf of the farm families of U.S. Wellness Meats  


Toll Free: (877) 383-0051
Direct Line:
(573) 767-9040
Fax Number: (573) 767-5475
Email: eathealthy@grasslandbeef.com
URL: www.uswellnessmeats.com


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In This Issue
INVENTORY UPDATES: STEAKS & FRANKS RESTOCK!
GRASSFED EXCHANGE: UPCOMING CONFERENCE!
HEALTH NEWS: CAN EXERCISE LOWER STROKE RISK?
ASK THE DOCTOR: HOW TO STOP STRESS
RECIPE CORNER: MEXICAN TRIPE SOUP
CUSTOMER COMMENTS: "WONDERFUL!"
FARM PHOTOS: SUMMER SUNSET
ABOUT US WELLNESS MEATS
CONFIDENTIALITY GUARANTEE
Inventory Updates
Upcoming Grassfed Exchange Event
GrassfedExchange
  • Who:  Grass-fed Producers and Interested Consumers
  • What: Grassfed Exchange Conference 2013 
  • When: August 20-22, 2013
  • Where: Bismarck, ND
  • Why: Learn what is happening in the grass-fed beef industry, and how producers are adapting to supply a growing consumer market. 

The Grassfed Exchange is a unique gathering of the leading grass-fed producers and interested consumers who are driving the grass-fed market.  There is truly something here for everyone.  Enjoy a full day of pasture tours and two full days of presentations from some of the leaders in this industry.  Check out the full schedule on their website, and be sure to register before July 29, 2013 for discounted pricing.  We are offering a 20% discount to the first 25 readers to use on their registration!  Simply type in promo code: Grassfed to save 20%! 

 

There are also opportunities to exhibit or advertise at the Grassfed Exchange, this will give you access to some of the top producers in the market today. 

 

Several of our producers have been involved with the Grassfed Exchange for many years, and will be in attendance in August and happy to answer any questions you might have about our operations.  We look forward to seeing you there!  

 

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healthRecent Health News
  
Regular, Vigorous Exercise May Lower Stroke Risk

Direct effect not shown in study, but experts say physical activity's impact is clear

(HealthDay News) - Exercising enough to break a sweat most days might slightly reduce the risk of stroke in middle-aged and older people compared to those who are inactive, a new study suggests -- although the findings aren't definitive and the difference may be insignificant.

Still, the study results indicate that "you can control your destiny with regards to stroke," said study lead author Michelle McDonnell. "A healthy diet, healthy body weight, regular exercise along with a moderate alcohol consumption and not smoking combined can reduce your risk of stroke by 80 percent. Here we show that regular physical activity is an important aspect of that and should be encouraged."

According to McDonnell, researchers already know that exercise directly reduces the risk of stroke by improving the health of blood vessels, and indirectly by improving risky traits such as high blood pressure and obesity.

The new study is unusual because it attempts to identify the effect of exercise on stroke risk and because it tracks people over time instead of relying on people's memories, said McDonnell, a lecturer in the School of Health Sciences at the University of South Australia.

The researchers tracked more than 27,000 Americans starting between 2003 and 2007 for an average of nearly six years. Many were blacks from the "Stroke Belt," an area of the southeastern United States that has an especially high stroke rate. Everyone was 45 or older at the beginning of the study, and none had previous strokes.

A total of 3.1 percent of those who said they vigorously exercised four or more times a week at the beginning of the study suffered strokes. The percentages were 3.3 for those who exercised one to three times weekly and 3.6 for those who didn't exercise, according to the study authors.

After adjusting their statistics so they wouldn't be thrown off by factors such as high or low numbers of people of certain ages, the researchers determined that those who exercised the most were 20 percent less likely to suffer strokes than those who exercised the least.

But that number dipped to 14 percent - considered to be statistically insignificant - once the researchers did more adjusting. In other words, the extra exercise appeared to have no effect after taking into account for traditional stroke risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, overweight, alcohol use and smoking.

However, this may be because the further adjustments eliminated the indirect influence of exercise on stroke - its effect on risk factors like high blood pressure, for example.

The research also suggested men got more benefit from exercise than women on the stroke front. "There has been some research to suggest that women perhaps benefit from less intense exercise, like walking, but seeing as we didn't ask this question in our study we really can't speculate any more than that," McDonnell said.

Steven Blair, a professor who studies exercise at the University of South Carolina, praised the study and said a 20 percent reduction in stroke risk is "a reasonably big deal," especially in comparison with medical treatments for some conditions that may have the same effect.

The message "is simply that everyone should strive to meet our Health and Human Services physical activity guidelines -- all adults should get 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity per week, 75 minutes of vigorous intensity activity, or mix and match with one minute of vigorous being equal to two minutes of moderate," Blair said. "The exercise bouts should be at least 10 minutes in duration. So if everyone took three 10-minute walks a day on at least five days of the week, this would have a dramatic effect on disease rates in the U.S. population."

The study appears online July 18 in the journal Stroke.
Dr.SerranoAsk the Doctor
MichaelKim
 
Dr. Kim,

I keep seeing more research linking stress to a multitude of health issues.  I have a high-stress job and put in more overtime than I should, and that combined with family issues constantly has my anxiety levels higher than they should be.  What is your opinion on alternative therapies such as yoga or pilates?  Can they really help with my stress levels?

Worried,
Angela S.
Baltimore, MD

_________________________________________

Angela,

Thank you for the question. I am sure that this question is something everyone has been wondering about. We live in a world where the stress level is higher, the days are shorter, and we want to do more. The world has perpetuated all of this. I am by no means telling you how you should live your life, but I will give you some suggestions that I share with friends, family, colleagues, patients:
  1. Remember what is the most important to you. Take a deep breath and truly enjoy the people you are surrounded by.
  2. Maybe it is time to take a look at your job and reassess the hours you put in since you have stated you put in more overtime than you should. I am just going by what you have shared with me, nothing else. This may alleviate some of the stress that is induced from work and put more pressure on you externally. 
  3. I cannot comment on your family issues but it may be a great thing to find some time for yourself, by yourself, and this is where we transition into your next two questions.  
Yoga and pilates are great for relaxation. However, during this time, it is key to make sure that you are not thinking about anything but the task at hand. The hour or two of taking the gas pedal off of your always "on the go" brain will definitely assist in your stress levels. The one thing that it will truly help with is that you will know when you are getting stressed, or anxious because now you have this avenue when you are completely stress/anxiety free. Does that make sense? Many of those that are high stress or anxious sometimes do not know it. It may take a period of time to get used to the period where you will be stress free during yoga/pilates. In the end, finding this time for yourself during the day will better your health.

Stress and anxiety put a lot of work on your adrenals, which in the end can lead to hormone imbalances, high blood pressure, etc. Take the time out of your day to take a deep breath, refocus, and lead a healthier life.

Good Luck,

Dr. Michael Kim

_________________________________________

Have a question?  Email any health and wellness questions for the question and answer series.   This series now also features Dr. Serrano's business partner, Dr. Mike Kim, MD.  He is consistently eating and living a healthy lifestyle because of his family connection with DM2, HTN, Hyperlipidemia. He is currently finishing his training in Anesthesiology, Critical Care, and Nutrition at the University of Colorado, Denver under the tutelage of Dr. Serrano, a world renowned nutrition specialist.

Dr. Kim is always seeking the latest and newest ways to help people with weight loss, athletic performance and healthy eating. He has a deep connection with MMA fighters, NFL athletes, and other professional athletes. He is at the forefront of breaking science with Muscle Pharm Sports Science and Research Center. His goal is to make living healthier for everyone, one meal at a time. 
RecipeRecipe Corner

Mexican Tripe Soup

Mexican Tripe Soup

Soup Base: Chili Paste:
  • dried guajillo chiles, stems and seeds removed
  • 1/2 medium white onion
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 tbsp dried oregano, Mexican oregano preferred (more to taste and to garnish)
  • 1 tsp dried cilantro
  • 2 16oz cans organic (non-GMO) hominy (optional)
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • juice of 2 limes
  • 1/2 medium white onion, diced (garnish)
  • crushed red pepper (garnish for additional spiciness)
* Menudo is made with all sorts of bones to make the broth, but the most common I've seen are pig's feet, cow's hooves, or beef knuckles. For my own purposes I used pig's feet to add an interesting dynamic and to avoid a soup that's too "beefy" tasting.

*I should also note that it's easiest to cut the tripe when it's partially frozen. Also, for the sake of saving time, you don't need to thaw out your pig's feet (or cow's hooves, beef knuckles) before cooking.

Directions:  
  1. Put the feet and tripe in a large pot, and fill it with water. Boil for 10 minutes, then drain and rinse gently with cold water. Return the pieces to the pot and fill with enough water to cover everything by at least 1", about 12 cups total. 
  2. Bring everything to a boil and reduce heat to a simmer, and simmer for one hour. Be sure to scoop up any foam or fat that accumulates on the surface. After an hour, add the bay leaves and simmer until the feet just start to fall apart, about another hour. Add water as needed to keep the pieces fully submerged.  

  3. As the soup simmers, prepare the chili paste by placing the chiles in a small pot with about one cup of water, and bring to a boil. Once it starts boiling, remove the pot of chiles from the heat and let it sit for about thirty minutes. Once they are cool, blend the chiles with the onion and garlic, adding some of the water you boiled the chiles in if the paste gets too thick.  

  4. Once the pig's feet are just starting to fall apart, add the chili paste (pour it through a strainer to catch any big chunks or seeds), oregano, and dried cilantro, and simmer for another 30 minutes. Next, fish the feet out and set them aside to cool while the soup simmers for another 30 minutes. This is also when you would add the hominy if you're using it. Once the feet are cool, remove any pieces of meat you can find and add it to the soup. Discard the rest of the feet.  

  5. After the soup has simmered for an additional 30 minutes (three hours total - one hour with just the tripe/feet, one hour with the bay leaves, 30 mins with the chili paste, 30 mins without the feet), it's ready to serve. Add salt and pepper to taste (probably about 1 tbsp salt and 1 tsp pepper), and add the lime juice. Serve with diced white onion and more dried oregano, and crushed red pepper for additional spiciness. Some people like to add fresh chopped cilantro as well.   

  6. Many people like to refrigerate this soup overnight and reheat the next day, to allow the flavors to marry, and I think that's a pretty good idea.  

__________________________  

This unique recipe is brought to you by our friend Russ at The Domestic Man.  He is a master at transforming authentic cuisine into paleo-friendly fare, be sure to visit his website for more recipes!

If you are a blogger or food artist and would like to see your recipes published simply email us.

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CustomerCommentsCustomer Feedback
Beef Sliders
I had the beef sliders for the first time and I think they are  WONDERFUL!!

They are on the regular fare list for me now along with the hot dogs - both kinds, the ground beef (best tasting ever!) and the ribeyes.

Ellen H.
via Facebook.

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Summer Sunset

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About U.S. Wellness Meats


U.S. Wellness Meats was founded on
US Wellness Cattle
September 1st, 2000. Pasture management and meat science research originated in 1997.

The company office is located in Monticello, Missouri in Lewis County which joins the Mississippi River 140 miles North of St. Louis.


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U.S. Wellness Meats

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On Sale Now
Flat Iron Steak
Sale items expire at 10 pm CST on Saturday, August 3, 2013.

Flat Iron Steaks
- 4 (8.5) oz steaks

Top Butt Sirloin Steak
- 6 oz

BBQ Short Ribs
- 1.5 lbs

Free Range Chicken Drumsticks
- 1.5 lbs
 
Volume Discounts

Kerrygold Salted Butter
Kerrygold Salted Butter
- 8 oz

Lamb Loin Chops
- 2 (6 oz) chops

Sugar-Free Turkey Jerky
- 8 oz

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